“Apoptosis” in the Galway Town Hall Theatre

The play for you “if you’re the kind of person who doesn’t have a five year plan.” (Director Rebecca Spelman)

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Directed and written by Calamity Theater’s founder, Rebecca Spelman, what started out as a one act play at the Galway Fringe Festival has now developed into a full length comedy drama three times the original size. It was now performed from 25th to 28th February 2019 in the Town Hall Theatre by Claire Ahearne, James McKenzie, Lucy Pollock, Sean Gandolfi, Joe Bohan and Tim Meaney. Its 80 minute run time packs in some big themes on the meaning of life as it relates to past, present and a bit of the future. Particularly, the options available to Baby Boomers and Millennials regarding work, love, society and religion are explored.

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Its depiction of modern friendship includes an adult coach squatter who doesn’t pay rent, can’t hold down a relationship and doesn’t have a job. His working friend, Claire, however doesn’t fare much better, having to deal with a skiving boss and unclear duties. We see her fending off the unreasonable customer entitlement of of an older woman and the inappropriate attention of her husband. The latter could have been better dealt with in my opinion. It is laughed off later on and those in charge do not properly hear this part of her account, something she reports only after the couple apparently make a complaint and she is called in.

In this scene, she tries to explain the rest of the affair and the hopelessness of her life situation. Trying to secure retail jobs without the unattainable “three years experience,” rejecting the dole as inadequate, compromising her ideals and barely surviving are things many young people today might relate to — right down to living off apples and pasta packets. It’s no wonder that she and her mooch of a friend come back to the emotional safety and moral simplicity of childhood TV shows and the nostalgia they evoke.

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The disruptive older couple have problems of their own as the traditional marriage-and-kids formula doesn’t pan out. The wife doesn’t work and “contributes” to the household, but cannot have children. The husband has cheated with an affair that lasted years and doesn’t seem to listen to her. They are clearly estranged yet for some reason still live together in bitterness. In the past, meta narratives were supposed to provide purpose through life’s trials, but it’s evident they didn’t always work.

Between scenes, we are in the hands of an indefatigable narrator with slides, a poster boy for Powerpoint presentations. He introduces and addresses the various topics, providing commentary on cultural trends and expectations. The treatment of religion is not completely objective, rather toting the secular side. That said, the comedic narrative maintains its distance from the plot, except when the narrator himself breaks down on the topic of loneliness. Cue, the annual get-together with the two Millennial friends where they drown their sorrows, knock back pills and blare nightclub music to reach a state of stupor and oblivion. It also seems the concept of a dystopian, fictional future is more comforting than the present.

The play doesn’t provide immediate solutions; it simply tells you to do whatever makes you happy. It’s the message that the narrator feels is worth dying to tell. The production has been called nihilistic, but perhaps Apoptosis is really about nipping destructive paths in the bud and living in the now.

Rebecca Spelman
Playwright and director Rebecca Spelman studied BA Drama & Theatre Performance Studies in NUIG before founding Calamity Theatre.
Apoptosis cast
The cast of Apoptosis at the Town Hall Theatre. All photo credits Piotr Łyszkiewicz.

Author: ashylecota

Intelligent, cultured analysis and religiously-, politically-neutral opinion from an Arts with Journalism student in Co Galway. The Bigger Picture is Right Here, Right Now.

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